Tuesday, December 9, 2008

Silence of the Lambs

 
A local shepherd sells his goats and sheep in preparation for the ritual slaughter of Eid al Adha. A goat will set you back US$95 and a ram $240.

5 comments:

San Diego Farmgirl December 10, 2008 at 8:23 AM  

If it's a ritual slaughter, are those amounts tithing, or do you get the meat? How much meat would a goat or ram yield?

AbuDhabiDailyPhotograph December 10, 2008 at 11:28 AM  

No, you get to keep the meat. Not sure how much meat a goat or ram gives but often families will keep a third for themselves, give a third to friends and the other third to charity. If you have the money you can buy a cow or even a camel.

Until this year people used to sacrifice the animals in the street but now you have to take your animal to the abattoir where it will be killed in accordance to the Muslim tradition of a single cut to the throat.

Rose December 10, 2008 at 6:48 PM  

That is a very interesting post... I just love it!

San Diego Farmgirl December 11, 2008 at 1:17 AM  

It's so odd, seeing the animals in that modern parking lot. What a stark contrast between traditional and modern!

Anonymous December 12, 2008 at 5:50 PM  

Well i guess there are planning who goes first ...........?

Lovely Picture

Related Posts with Thumbnails

Wanna Chat?


Try Relay: the free SMS and picture text app for iPhone.

Blog archive

Email service

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of updates by email

Delivered by FeedBurner

Bookmark & Share

Bookmark and Share

Total Visitors

Total Pageviews

About this blog

A collection of photographs portraying life in one of the world's wealthiest cities - Abu Dhabi, the island capital of the United Arab Emirates by Peter Waters, a photography aficionado and finalist of the du Social Media Awards 2012 for Best Blog/Blogger

© All rights reserved peterwaters@gmail.com

Buy the book

By Peter Waters &...

Rich Sheiks click here

Want to see more cities?

  © Blogger template 'The Pattern' by Ourblogtemplates.com 2008

Back to TOP